Variance Log

sartorialgrow:

The man in the photograph, Yukio Akamine, demonstrates one way to relate a pocket square, a necktie and a suit to each other.
The suit main color is brown, the tie ground is beige and the pocket square is half orange and half mustard. The colors do not match, they complementeach other. Notice how the orange in the pocket square is subtlety present in the suit’s and tie’s patterns. This brings all the individual pieces together.
Also, we must consider the texture of the fabrics, because we can create interest by contrasting textures. Mr. Akamine demonstrates this with a necktie and a pocket square that brings some sheen to the otherwise matte outfit.
And that’s one way to relate our suits to our neckties, hankies and vice versa. 

sartorialgrow:

The man in the photograph, Yukio Akamine, demonstrates one way to relate a pocket square, a necktie and a suit to each other.

The suit main color is brown, the tie ground is beige and the pocket square is half orange and half mustard. The colors do not match, they complementeach other. Notice how the orange in the pocket square is subtlety present in the suit’s and tie’s patterns. This brings all the individual pieces together.

Also, we must consider the texture of the fabrics, because we can create interest by contrasting textures. Mr. Akamine demonstrates this with a necktie and a pocket square that brings some sheen to the otherwise matte outfit.

And that’s one way to relate our suits to our neckties, hankies and vice versa. 

That Japanese-Italian Style

dieworkwear:

image


The term “timeless style” can feel like such a cliché nowadays, but it’s genuinely amazing how little — and how awesome — Yukio Akamine’s style has changed since I first saw him on The Sartorialist nearly ten years ago. Granted, ten years is hardly timeless, but with how quickly fashion moves on the internet, that almost feels like a lifetime ago.

Akamine has described his style as being traditionally British, but I actually think of it as an Japanese-Italian interpretation of British clothes. The fabrics are heavy, but the tailoring — save for a few sharply cut double breasted jackets — mostly looks soft and rounded. The shoulders are unconstructed and sloping, lapels slightly extended, and the quarters gently curved. His shirt collars also look soft and unfused, and the points are long in a way that you almost only see in Southern Italy nowadays. For casualwear, he seems to like the kind of slim fitting suede A-1 blousons that Valstar made famous in the 1960s, and like many Italians, pairs them with tailored trousers.

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thearmoury:

NOMOS now available at The Armoury NYC! This is the NOMOS Orion, one of my first loves in the watch world. Manual in-house movement, gold markers and blued steel hands. An absolutely perfect first dress watch, especially in the 35mm size. The long lugs make it wear slightly larger. 

thearmoury:

NOMOS now available at The Armoury NYC! This is the NOMOS Orion, one of my first loves in the watch world. Manual in-house movement, gold markers and blued steel hands. An absolutely perfect first dress watch, especially in the 35mm size. The long lugs make it wear slightly larger. 

wwchantailor:

Blue Scabal “Young Generation” sport jacket(one button, peak lapel, Neapolitan shoulder)
E. G. Cappelli tie & pocket square

wwchantailor:

Blue Scabal “Young Generation” sport jacket
(one button, peak lapel, Neapolitan shoulder)

E. G. Cappelli tie & pocket square